HEALTH JOURNEY TAYBOB TRAVEL

CONTINUING SHARING MY HEALTH JOURNEY – HYDRODISTENTIONS

Continuing sharing my health journey from my last post. I was set to move to the state of California where medical marijuana was legal but then my health took another turn. My hormones began raging again even though I had received several Lupron injections which placed me in a chemically induced menopausal state to treat my endometriosis/ovarian cyst complications/severe pelvic pain & uterus spasms which worsened with my menstrual cycles. My boobs became incredible tender & my nipples started to crack & bleed. I then started a terrible period – it was heavy, painful, & did not seem to want to stop. My gynecologist & I decided we would try an IUD – let me say that was one of the more painful medical treatments I had experienced. However the IUD did nothing but aggravate my uterus even more. We ended up taking the IUD out. But I ended up bleeding for 30 days. When the bleeding did stop I was terribly anemic. I spent a day in the hospital receiving an iron infusion. Unfortunately all this lead my interstitial cystitis to flare again & not even the cannabis was cutting the pain. After 3 months of trying to get the pain down my urologist told me we needed to do a cystoscopy with hydrodistention. This procedure begins with the inserting of a cystoscope through your urethra and into your bladder. This “scope,” which is fitted with a miniature camera, enables the physician to see the interior surface of your bladder to look for Hunner’s ulcers and other abnormalities. The doctor will first examine your bladder by viewing it through the cystoscope. After the initial cystoscopic examination, the physician will “hydrodistend” the bladder by filling it with fluid at a low pressure (60 to 80 centimeters) and keeping it full for one to five minutes before letting the fluid out. This process causes the bladder wall to stretch out (distend), allowing the physician to re-inspect your bladder with the cystoscope. This procedure is used both to check the condition of an IC patient’s bladder & to treat the bladder. My bladder did show the Hunner’s ulcers which affects about 5-10% of IC patients #interstitialcystitisawareness More of my journey to come 💚Photo taken at Mammoth Lakes, CA

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